AN INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE CANADIANS IN NIAGARA Part II

October 1, 2012 at 6:16 pm
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Some settler families found economic relief when their children were taken into the homes of prominent local families as “schoolboys” and “schoolgirls.”In return for room and board, they provided domestic services that included housekeeping, cooking and baby-sitting. One nisei even acted as a chauffeur and was able to use his employer’s car for outings with other schoolboys and schoolgirls.

STANDING TOGETHER WITH THE MUSLIM COMMUNITY

October 1, 2012 at 5:38 pm
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The National Association of Japanese Canadians was invited three years ago by the Islamic Social Services Association (ISSA) to participate in an innovative program entitled the Canadian Muslim Leadership Institute (CMLI). The primary aim of this program is to nurture future leaders within the Muslim communities. It was recognized that an important aspect in developing leadership in the Muslim communities was a commitment to engage other communities that held similar values of diversity, social harmony and human rights.

AN INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE CANADIANS IN NIAGARA

August 21, 2012 at 8:49 pm
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Along the Toronto to Niagara Falls corridor are names like Beamsville, Grimsby, Vineland and St. Catharines, names unfamiliar to tourists and even to many Ontarians. For decades the experiences and fortunes of Japanese Canadians who settled there remained untold. In 1998, their stories were captured on tape and in a book: Exiles in Our Own Country: Japanese Canadians in Niagara, a poignant reminder that the newcomers arrived not by choice or by immigration but were exiles from their home province of British Columbia.